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From Bobby Chiu's Youtube channel www.youtube.com/digitalbobert
Today's stream will be guest starring character designer Stephen Silver. 
When: Dec 30, 2015. 10-11am ET
Where: livestream.com/accounts/669347…
ChiuStream is a live broadcast where I paint and draw as I answers questions from the audience.
I'm giving the MP3 of my audiobook "The Perfect Bait​" for free until Jan 31. Help me share some good vibes? 
drive.google.com/folderview?id…
Thank you to everyone that helped make this book a hit. It's been sold out / out of print for a while now so I'd like to send it out into the world for free. I'm not looking for email sign ups or any strings attached. It's just a free mp3 download from my googledrive but please share it with your fellow artists if you like it. Happy holidays everyone! Sending positive vibes to everyone.
Huge thank you to all those that helped me and/or advised me over the years and your contribution to this book years ago: Kei Acedera​, Stephen Silver​, Everett Downing​, Aaron Hartline​, Chris Sanders​, Peter de Sève​, Dice Tsutsumi​, Dylan Cole, J Scott Campbell​, Kris Pearn​, Lynn Johnston, Michael Kutsche​, Mike Mignola​, Jason Seiler​ and Marcelo Vignali​

Best wishes,
Bobby
ChiuStream happening now! Livebroadcast with fine artist Jon Hardesty & I livestream.com/accounts/669347…
Come join me for some painting, drawing and conversation on CHIUSTREAM today (Dec 17) 10am-11:30am ET
livestream.com/accounts/669347…
Starts at 7am PT/10am ET
Ends at 8am PT/11am ET

livestream.com/accounts/669347…

Drawing, painting, talking about art and chatting it up with the crowd and taking questions.
Come and join us!
Here's a really good video about how color relates to exposure. Some very valuable information here for professional artists.
 

Editorial illustrator extraordinaire, Jason Seiler shares his techniques and thoughts about his cover piece for The New York Observer. Watch and learn how Jason captured Mark Ruffalo's likeness.

Jason Seiler is an instructor on Schoolism www.schoolism.com/school.php?i…

Painting Tutorial on Comparing Values with Oscar Nominated artists Dice Tsutsumi and Robert Kondo.
In this video they are giving out their feedback on their Schoolism students assignments.

Take Painting with Light and Color course taught by Dice Tsutsumi and Robert Kondo online!
www.schoolism.com/school.php?i…

Visit Student's Facebook Page to share your assignments from this class! Dice and Robert will be checking out this page everyday!
www.facebook.com/events/140093…


Hey everyone, 2000 Schoolism Subscriptions now available! If you're interested in professional art education, I highly recommend this. Last time subscriptions were available, it sold out in 5 days.

Favorite and Comment on which class you'd choose for chance to win a 1yr Schoolism Subscription. Winner to be announced on Wednesday.

Oddworld Creator Lorne Lanning interview.
MEET THE CREATIVE MIND BEHIND ODDWORLD
One of the founding members of Oddworld Inhabitants in 1994, Lorne Lanning has been at the helm of the critically acclaimed fantasy realm, Oddworld throughout its long and storied existence. CLICK the banner above to see Bobby Chiu interview Lorne on what it's been like to be involved in the digital painting, computer graphics and video game revolution over the past 20 years.
 
Craig Mullins - Digital Painting Master. Halo, Armageddon, Forrest Gump, Matrix
Terryl Whitlatch - Creature Expert. Star Wars, Beowolf, Jumanji, 
Stephen Silver - Character Designer. Kim Possible, Danny Phantom
Jeff Turley - Production Designer. Paperman, Tangled, Wreck-it-Ralph
Karla Ortiz - Live action concept artist. Jurassic World, ILM, Marvel Studios
Bobby Chiu - Creature/Character Designer. Alice in Wonderland, Alice through the Looking Glass (2016)

Join us Oct 24-25, 2015 in Denver for an epic workshop and party.
Promocode to save some cash: CHIU
www.schoolism.com/workshop-den…
Iain McCaig is one of my all time artistic heroes. It's an honor and privilege to bring you this interview.

Short tutorial I put together. Let me know about future topics you'd like to see!

www.schoolism.com/workshop-sto…
Schoolism LIVE Stockholm. October 3-4, 2015
Pixar's Louis Gonzales
Disney's Mike Yamada
Jason Seiler TIME, Rolling Stone, New York Times
Me
& 2 bonus guests to be announced later.
It's going to be insane.
Here's a promocode to save some cash: CHIU
Five main points. If you can do all five of these, you're going to have a great career. Before you can strengthen your career with these concepts to follow, though, there’s something that you need first: talent. You don’t have to be born with talent, but you do have to work hard at developing it. 

#1 - Have a Career Compass.
A lot of people when asked, will say that they have an idea of what their goal is. Maybe they want to work on a game or a movie, but they don’t have it narrowed down any further than that. Be very specific about your goals. What kind of movie do you want to work on? What kind of game? Get into the details. Once you have enough details, then you can use that goal as your ‘career compass’. Whatever moves you make, make sure that you think about your compass, and think if your next move is going to take you closer to your goal. My goal was to work on a Tim Burton movie so every job and painting I did was not based on how much it paid but instead on whether or not it was complementary to something I could see Tim Burton doing in one of his films.

The choices won’t always be crystal clear, but sometimes they are. If you get asked to work on an independent movie, and that’s your goal, then that’s super clear. But it won’t always play out like that. Just make sure that every move you make brings you closer to your goal, and aligns with your compass.

Look out for instances where you get offered a job that is simple but doesn't align with your goals. Some people will think “It won’t take long, so I’ll do it.” Those jobs are the worst! If you don't desperately need the money, don't take it. Those jobs won’t bring you towards your goal, they are merely a sidestep or even a step backwards because the time you waste on projects that don’t align with your career compass is time you could have spent on improving your art or learning something useful to get you closer to your goal.

Read the rest of the article posted on my Facebook page
Posted the article on my Facebook www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbi…

Bobby

5 Ways to Create Opportunities with Bobby Chiu

by Bobby Chiu & Flynn Ringrose


1 - "No" really means "Not right now."

One of the most important things I’ve learned about opportunities is that the people that receive the most, and I’m counted in this, are the people that don't take no as final. We’re okay with getting a harsh no, or a few of them. When rejection happens, learn to put a smile on your face, go back, reassess, and come back with a new approach or completely new portfolio. If you know in your heart that you are willing to take ten harsh rejections without giving up, then most likely you won't have to.


2 - Don’t sit waiting for your ship to come in.

One thing I see all the time that I think is unfortunate is that many artists wait and wait for the perfect job. Here’s my advice for that, just go and do it! Just go pretend. One of the things that helped me starting out before we did Alice in Wonderland, was pretending that we were already working on a Tim Burton film. Every project we had that was close enough, we’d try to make it complementary to what we thought would be cool in a Tim Burton movie.

You can’t just sit there saying “I wish” and “I imagine” unless you’re doing it in a way that helps you get to that destination. That’s what helped me with getting on Alice in Wonderland, thinking about it all the time, but also always working towards it.

There is something to be said about waiting for your dream job. Just don’t sit there and do nothing. I think not enough people wait for their dream job in a way. They take the first jobs that come to them that are half-decent and go with that. That’s what happened to me way back. I took a job working on a television show that I didn’t particularly like the style or quality of because I had just got out of school and that’s what they tell you you’re supposed to do. Did it help excel my career? No, it was like a sidestep, or even a backstep away from my goal. So only take jobs that move you towards your goals if you can help it.


3 - Keep learning.

You can’t settle, especially nowadays. Things change so rapidly in films, games and art. It evolves every year. So you have to adopt the idea that you’re a life-long student. Because if you’re not advancing, the world is going to advance right past you, even if you’re successful now, it’s going to be hard for you ten years from now if you don’t keep learning.

Every couple years we try to take a month or two off to do a gallery show to strengthen, improve and evolve. And right now I’m trying to gear my schedule so that I can take more courses. You know, before when we were starting Schoolism, I was able to take all the classes. Recently, because we’re doing more things, we’re traveling a lot more, it’s harder. But I gotta stick to what has gotten me to where I am which has been learning constantly. And I gotta make time and get back there.

You can’t keep drawing if you don’t stop to sharpen your pencil every once in a while.


4 - Start a landslide.

Taking opportunities leads to more opportunities. For example, how did I meet Glen Keane, my all-time artistic hero? I took an opportunity to go to Angoulême, France to set up a table at their annual comic festival. I don’t know French, but I heard it was a good opportunity, so we went. And we met these two gallery owners who are now some of our best friends. Jean-Jacques Launier, and Diane Launier. They own a gallery named Arludik. Years later, at CTN in Burbank, Jean-Jacque and Diane were there and we were there and they introduced us to Glen Keane, and then later, we did a gallery show in Paris and Glen Keane came, and we talked a little bit again, and then through opportunity again, because I knew John Carls, a producer on Rango (2011). We’d spoken a bunch of times but never worked together, but we were very cordial to each other. He was organizing a talk in Savannah, and he invited Glen Keane and I, and so I was on stage with Glen Keane and got to spend a couple days with him.

Some people, they just do their convention, or their show, and then they go home. Some people don’t make friends at school, they don’t even know their classmates names, and if there’s one way to lose out on opportunities that can change your life. That’s it.


5 - Live in a way that generates more opportunities.

The best way to make opportunities come to you is to gear your habits and your principles in a way that helps you come across more great opportunities. For example, always try to meet new people. If you’re always trying to meet new people, and that’s a principle you live by, then guaranteed, you’re going to have more opportunities.

Don’t do anything unless you think it through and it makes sense to you. If it makes sense to though, then you have to do it. Get into that mindset and promise yourself that if you know it’ll be good for you, then you’re going to do it.

Just like education. Some people might think, “Oh yeah, that would totally help me, but I don’t have the time.” Maybe because the person isn’t making enough money, but the thing is, if they had more skills, they’d make more money!

The main thing is, you gotta do the things that make sense to you. For example, our Kickstarter is almost done, and if you pledge on the Kickstarter, you’re actually going to get a better price then you would when we launch the subscriptions on Schoolism. www.kickstarter.com/projects/b… If it makes sense to pledge for education from the industry’s best for as little as $10/month, you gotta do it! It would be crazy if you don’t because these opportunities will pass you by if you keep waiting forever.


At some point, you gotta pull over so that you can sharpen your pencil, and get back in the game.

KING JOFFREY GAME OF THRONES ANIMATED! BONUS TUTORIAL
It’s our mission to bring you the latest and greatest art education we can. It is thus our pleasure to present to you this wonderful character design tutorial from Schoolism instructor, Stephen Silver​! In this video, Stephen educates and inspires with his unmistakable blend of skill and panache.

Click on the link below to see how Stephen recreates King Joffrey from hit TV show, Game of Thrones in his own unique style.
www.kickstarter.com/projects/b…

Have an artist in mind you’d like to learn from? Sound off in the comments to let us know what tutorials you’d like to see in the future!

Schoolism Subscriptions: Affordable Education campaign has 3 days left and 1 more stretch goal to go on Kickstarter. To help reach this goal, any reward $100 or more will receive an additional free month in their subscription. 
Interview by Flynn Ringrose

Number One

is to wake up hours before your day job begins and spend that time doing your own stuff. This is very effective, but it’s difficult to keep up with because it often means you have to get up at 4:00 or 5:00 in the morning and that’s especially difficult in the Winter when the Sun isn’t even up at those times!

This is great because, one, you’re beginning the day doing a hard thing which makes you feel good because you started off with something challenging. Two, when you get up hours before work and do your own art, you’ll see results, that you created something, and that makes you feel even more productive. Why give your best hours, and this is weird to say, but why give your best hours to your job? Why not give it to yourself which will in turn, benefit your job?

Number Two

don’t do emails until the afternoon. If you email them in the morning, then they might respond to you in the afternoon and you’ll have to respond to them twice in a day, instead of just once.

Number Three

make your to-do list the day before you need it. I like to write my to-do list around 2:00 or 3:00 in the afternoon. Just go through it ahead of time to update it with what’s important now and what you’ve finished. This is important because if you come into work in the morning and you know exactly what you need to do, you’ll be more efficient. If you don’t write down the first thing to do tomorrow, that’s when you’ll stand around the water cooler talking to your friends, get a coffee, look on the internet, whatever it is. It’s hard to get momentum when you start off slow, but it’s very easy to keep momentum when you come in running. You get through so much more stuff that way.

Number Four

spend a minimum of 5% of your income back into your art. Spend this money on education for yourself, equipment, and networking. Equipment meaning a new computer, art materials, etc. Networking means going to conventions, workshops, that kind of stuff. A minimum of 5%. For me, because of Schoolism, I’ve been able to go way beyond that because I don’t need to spend money a lot of times to educate myself so I can spend money on other things such as attending events but after a while you get invited to events so you have to spend that money elsewhere and so on. As you start down your artistic path, that’s what’s going to happen to you and it’s going to get harder and harder to spend that 5% which makes it even more awesome.

Number Five

always find room for non-urgent but important things. There are usually consequences you strive to avoid that force you to attend to super important and urgent matters in your life. Like you’re going to lose your apartment, the taxman is going to knock on your door, whatever it may be. But the things that aren’t urgent but are important, those are the things that are going to excel your life. Like maybe learning how to use ZBrush, even though you just like to paint. That’s going to help you in some way, you might not know how, but it’s just like how Steve Jobs learning typography helped him make the Apple Computer.

Stick to those five things, and you’ll notice dramatic improvement in your productivity and career if you haven’t already.

Bonus Q&A


Does a routine really make a difference in your art? A lot of artists swear by only doing art when they feel like it. Do you think that’s dangerous just waiting around for inspiration?

Man, the people who are waiting around for inspiration, they’re in trouble most of the time. Especially if you’re working on a film, waiting for inspiration, and you don’t do anything all day. Then what are you going to tell the director? What are you going to tell the producer? You can’t do that! And actually, the routine helps with that because if you have a good routine, you generally won’t have bad drawing days if you just stick with that routine. The only time I experience bad drawing days is when I don’t stick with my routine.

Was there a time when you thought that you’d never need a routine?

Totally, that was part of the reason I wanted to be independent, because I wanted to do my own thing and I didn’t want people telling me what to do and when to do it. Then business started picking up, and more and more people wanted to work with us. And when you want to work on more stuff, and accomplish more things, you need to have a routine to maximize your time. If you just go by the seat of your pants, you’re not going to accomplish as much. You might accomplish more interesting things perhaps, but not as many productive things.

Just a reminder that there's only 5 days left to get a subscription to Schoolism through our kickstarter campaign for very affordable prices, as low as $10/month. Please help me spread the word! www.kickstarter.com/projects/b…